Consumers and businesses must be wary of their cybersecurity when it comes to Internet of Things. IoT devices has arrived, and is forecast to reach 160 billion USD this year.

Smart speakers such as Google Home, Amazon Alexa, and Apple HomePod are dragging a new market of smart plugs, lights, and whitegoods with them. IP-connected Internet-of-Thing devices can be found in our buses and trains; on our streets and in other public spaces; and throughout most workplaces, from offices, to mines deep underground.

The biggest immediate downside of IoT is the cybersecurity risk. People adopt new devices without thinking through the potential for them to be compromised, opening up all kinds of opportunities for the unscrupulous. The convenience of controlling room temperature via an application was turned into a potentially deadly situation by hackers in Finland, who disabled a building’s heating system amid near-Arctic temperatures. IoT attacks can cripple an entire city or country by targeting essential public infrastructure such as utilities.

As the market for the Internet of Things (IoT) increases, so will the booming security vulnerabilities that cybercriminals continue to look at exploiting. Many devices that have little or no inbuilt security are connected to the internet and are increasingly linked to corporate IT systems. Security Boulevard estimate that the number of loT attacks will double in the next 12 months and the number of security products available will not serve to protect the loT endpoints and devices already accessible to hackers.

Any questions… feel free to reach out to me via [email protected] or in a comment below.

Cheers!

Dan Duran – CTO – Rhyno Cybersecurity

About Rhyno Cybersecurity

Here at Rhyno, we work seamlessly with company leaders and their staff, helping to bridge internal divides that can weaken an organization’s security framework.